40Ar/39Ar ages from the Selawik A-2, A-3 and A-4 and Candle B-5 quadrangles, Alaska

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Frequently-anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
40Ar/39Ar ages from the Selawik A-2, A-3 and A-4 and Candle B-5 quadrangles, Alaska
Abstract:
40Ar/39Ar data from seven plutonic samples and one metamorphic sample collected during mineral assessment studies in 1991 show that various rock units in the Selawik Hills plutonic complex were emplaced in the order syenite/monzonite (nonfoliated, 106.6 ± 0.8 Ma; foliated, 101.7 ± 0.7 Ma; both on hornblende), followed by nepheline syenite (103.7 ± 0.8 Ma on hornblende) and then quartz monzonite (100.4 ± 3.7 Ma on biotite). 40Ar/39Ar data from Granite Mountain hornblendes yielded ages slightly older, but overlapping, those from Selawik Hills. In this suite, the silica-undersaturated phase appears to be younger (105.7 ±0.8 Ma) than the silica-saturated phase(s) (106.8 ± 0.8 Ma and 107.1 ± 0.8 Ma).
Supplemental_Information:
Attribute information for the following tables (entities) is included in this metadata file under the "Entity_and_Attribution_Information" section:
Locations_Results_AnalyticalData		coordinates of sample locations, 40Ar/39Ar age summary, analytical data (Tables 1, 2, 3)
  1. How should this data set be cited?

    Layer, P.W., and Solie, D.N., 200811, 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Selawik A-2, A-3 and A-4 and Candle B-5 quadrangles, Alaska: Raw Data File RDF 2008-5, State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, Alaska - USA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: 14 p.

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -161.5744
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -159.8142
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 66.17045
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 65.40369

  3. What does it look like?

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Calendar_Date: 1991
    Currentness_Reference: observed

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: tabular digital data

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      This is a Point data set.

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

      Grid_Coordinate_System_Name: Universal Transverse Mercator
      Universal_Transverse_Mercator:
      UTM_Zone_Number: 4
      Transverse_Mercator:
      Scale_Factor_at_Central_Meridian: 9.9996
      Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -153.000
      Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0
      False_Easting: 500000
      False_Northing: 0

      Planar coordinates are encoded using coordinate pair
      Abscissae (x-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 1
      Ordinates (y-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 1
      Planar coordinates are specified in meters

      The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1927.
      The ellipsoid used is Clarke 1866.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378206.4.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/294.978698.

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    Table1_coordinates.csv
    Coordinates for 40Ar/39Ar samples (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    SampleNo
    Items in the Sample Number field (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Sample numbers are unique identifiers derived from the last two digits of the year the sample was collected, initials of the geologist's name who collected it, and the consecutively numbered station location. If more than one sample was collected from the station location, each is assigned a letter (a, b, c, etc) designator as well.

    Easting
    UTM easting coordinate, Zone 4, NAD 27 (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:394311
    Maximum:463220
    Units:m

    Northing
    UTM northing coordinate, Zone 4, NAD 27 (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:7255163
    Maximum:7339612
    Units:m

    Latitude
    Latitude coordinate, NAD 27 (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:65.40369
    Maximum:66.17045
    Units:decimal degree

    Longitude
    Longitude coordinate, NAD27 (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:159.81421
    Maximum:161.57441
    Units:decimal degree

    Table2_agesummary.csv
    Summary table for 40Ar/39Ar data (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geohysical Surveys)

    Min.
    Material used for age date (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Material used for dating. Includes Bio (biotite) or Hbd (hornblende).

    Integrated Age (Ma)
    Integrated age in million years, (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:98.8+-0.7
    Maximum:107.4+-0.8
    Units:Ma

    Plateau Age
    Summarizes the Plateau (P) Age or the Weighted Mean (W) Age in Million years for each sample (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:100.4+-3.7
    Maximum:107.1+-0.8
    Units:Ma

    Plateau Information
    Summarizes number of fractions, percent 39Ar released and MSWD for each sample (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    # of fractions, % 39Ar released, MSWD for each sample

    SampleName
    Items in the Sample Name field (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Sample numbers are unique identifiers derived from the last two digits of the year the sample was collected, initials of the geologist's name who collected it, and the consecutively numbered station location. If more than one sample was collected from the station location, each is assigned a letter (a, b, c, etc) designator as well.

    Rock type
    name of rock type of sample (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    rock type, either a type of plutonic rock or a generalized metamorphic rock

    Mass
    mass of sample that was dated, in grams (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0605
    Maximum:0.3588
    Units:grams

    #
    number of fractions in the step heat (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:9
    Maximum:12
    Units:each

    K2O
    Weight % K2O as estimated from 39Ar release (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.72
    Maximum:7.15
    Units:weight %

    CaO
    weight % CaO estimated from 37Ar release (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.64
    Maximum:15.37
    Units:weight %

    Isochron age
    Isochron age and intial 40Ar/36Ar, both calculated from regression of isotopic compositions of individual step-heated fractions. Initial is the intercept of regression line. (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:101.6+-0.8
    Maximum:107.1+-0.8
    Units:Ma

    Table3_analytical data.csv
    For each sample, the 40Ar/39Ar analytical data associated with each temperature recorded is presented. (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Temp
    Temperature in Degrees C of step for which data were recorded (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:400
    Maximum:1600
    Units:Degrees C

    Cum. 39Ar
    Cumulative 39Argon (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0000
    Maximum:1.0000

    40Ar/39Ar measured
    Measured 40Ar/39Ar ratio at each heating step, corrected for blank and 39Ar decay (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0001
    Maximum:634.0000

    +/-
    Defines the size of the error bars for each ratio measurement to one standard deviation (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0000
    Maximum:509.0000

    37Ar/39Ar measured
    The ratio of 37Ar to 39Ar measured at each temperature interval for each sample corrected for blank and 37Ar and 39Ar decay (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.00000
    Maximum:23.00000

    36Ar/39Ar
    Ratio of amounts of 36Ar to 39Ar measured at each temperature interval for each sample corrected for blank and 39Ar decay (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0000
    Maximum:3.2000

    % Atm. 40Ar
    Percent of 40Ar which is atmospheric in composition (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0
    Maximum:150.0

    Ca/K
    ratio of Calcium to Potassium as determined from 37Ar/39Ar (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0000
    Maximum:43.0000

    Cl/K
    ration of Chloring to Potassium as determined from 38Ar/39Ar (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.00000
    Maximum:0.15000

    40Ar*/39ArK
    ratio of radiogenic 40Ar to 39Ar derived from potassium (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0000
    Maximum:12.0000

    Age (Ma)
    calculated age for each temperature step for each sample (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.0
    Maximum:185.0
    Units:Ma

    +-(Ma)
    Defines the size of the error bars for each measurement to one standard deviation (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:0.2
    Maximum:3167.0
    Units:Ma


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

    This research was supported by State funding to the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. Additional Acknowledgments: members of the 1991 DGGS field teams: Thomas K. Bundtzen, Rainer J. Newberry, Greg M. Laird, Ellen E. Harris, Milt A. Wiltse, Jeffrey T. Kline, Thomas E. Smith, Shirley A. Liss and Karen H. Clautice. Review of draft manuscript by D.J. Szumigala.

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys
    GIS Data Manager/Cartographer
    3354 College Road
    Fairbanks, AK 99709-3707

    (907) 451-5029 (voice)
    (907) 451-5050 (FAX)
    dggspubs@alaska.gov

    Contact_Instructions:
    You may view our web site at <http://www.dggs.dnr.state.ak.us> for the latest information on available data. Please e-mail your questions and data requests when possible since our web site and e-mail address will remain current even if our phone number and mailing address change.


Why was the data set created?

In 1991, the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) conducted helicopter-supported field work in west-central Alaska as part a state-wide project to review selected areas of federal land that were eligible at the time for selection by Alaska to become state land. DGGS’s role in the project was to evaluate mineral resource potential in the eligible units of land by acquiring data to outline permissive mineral terranes and to define mineral deposit types that could occur in each land selection unit (DGGS Staff, 1992). The data in this report resulted from investigations in the Selawik Hills and Granite Mountain areas as part of the land selection project. Geochemical and major oxide data (Solie and others, 1993a) and electron microprobe data (Solie and others, 1993b) were previously published. A brief discussion of our 40Ar/39Ar results from the Selawik Hills was presented at a Geological Society of America meeting (Solie and Layer, 1993). The purpose of this DGGS Raw Data File (RDF) is to present all our 40Ar/39Ar results from the Selawik Hills and Granite Mountain and make them available for use.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

    Lanphere and others, 1990 (source 1 of 7)
    Lanphere, M.A., Dalrymple, G.B., Fleck, R.J., and Pringle, M.S., 1990, Intercalibration of mineral standards for K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar age measurements: EOS Transactions of the American Geophysical Union v. 71.

    Other_Citation_Details: (abstract), P. 1658
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Describes intercalibration standards

    McDougall and others, 1999 (source 2 of 7)
    McDougall, Ian, and Harrison, T.M., 1999, Geochronology and Thermochronology by the 40Ar/39Ar method: Oxford University Press, Oxford.

    Other_Citation_Details: 269 pp
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution:
    Source reference for equations and corrections used in age calculation.

    Samson and Alexander, 1987 (source 3 of 7)
    Samson, S.D., and Alexander, E.C., 1987, Calibration of the interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar dating standard, MMhb-1: Chemical Geology v. 66.

    Other_Citation_Details: p.27-34
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Interlaboratory calibration data for age determination

    Steiger and Jager, 1977 (source 4 of 7)
    Steiger, R.H., and Jager, E, 1977, Subcommission on geochronology: convention on the use of decay constants in geo- and cosmochronology: Earth and Planetary Science Letters v.36.

    Other_Citation_Details: p. 359-363
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: discussion of use of decay constants in age determination

    Solie and others, 1993a (source 5 of 7)
    Solie, D.N., Harris, E.E., Bundtzen, T.K., Wiltse, M.A., Newberry, R.J., Kline, J.T., and Smith, T.E., 199303, Land Selection Unit 16 (Selawik, Candle, Norton Bay, Unalakleet, Kateel River, and Nulate quadrangles): references,DGGS sample locations, geochemical and major oxide data: Public Data File PDF 93-16a, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 54 p.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: geochemical and major oxide data from study area

    Solie and others, 1993b (source 6 of 7)
    Solie, D.N., Severin, K.P., and Lear, K.G., 199305, Electron microprobe data from Selawik Hills and Granite Mountain plutonic rocks, western Alaska: Public Data File PDF 93-16b, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 11 p.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: electron microprobe data from rocks in study area

    Solie and Layer, 1993 (source 7 of 7)
    Solie, D.N., and Layer, P.W., 1993, Evidence of synmagmatic foliation in the Selawik Hills, NW Alaska, based on 40Ar/39Ar age determinations: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs v.25, no.5.

    Other_Citation_Details: abstract, p.149.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: preliminary presentation of age results

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: Jul-1991 (process 1 of 2)
    Fieldwork - Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) conducted helicopter-supported field work in west-central Alaska as part a state-wide project to review selected areas of federal land that were eligible at the time for selection by Alaska to become state land. Rock samples were collected in the Selawik Hills and Granite Mountain areas during summer 1991. Members of the field crew were Diana N. Solie, Thomas K. Bundtzen, Rainer J. Newberry, Greg M. Laird, Ellen E. Harris, Milt A. Wiltse, Jeffrey T. Kline, Thomas E. Smith, Shirley A. Liss and Karen H. Clautice.Geochemical and major oxide data from samples collected during the Selawik Hills project were published (Solie and others, 1993a). Selected electron microprobe data from rocks collected from Selawik Hills and Granite Mountain were published in Solie and others, 1993b. A brief discussion of the 40Ar/39Ar age results was given in an abstract by Solie and Layer (1993).

    Data sources used in this process:

    • Solie and others, 1993a
    • Solie and others, 1993b
    • Solie and Layer, 1993

    Date: 1991 (process 2 of 2)
    Labwork - Separates for 40Ar/39Ar dating were prepared to >99.5 percent purity (visual inspection) using standard heavy liquid and magnetic separation techniques followed by hand-picking under a binocular microscope. Thin section examination of the samples prior to crushing indicated that the chosen minerals were free from alteration and sufficiently coarse-grained for mechanical separation. For all minerals, grains in the size range of 250 - 500 microns were used. For each sample, ~50-80 mg of biotite or 250-350 mg of hornblende or ‘whole rock’ (phenocryst-free groundmass) was packaged in an aluminum foil tube and irradiated in position 5C at the McMaster University nuclear reactor, in Hamilton, Ontario. Approximately 20 samples were irradiated at a time. Six packages containing ~20 mg of the standard mineral mmhb-1 (Samson and Alexander, 1987) with an age of 513.9 Ma (Lanphere and others, 1990) were also irradiated with the samples to determine the irradiation parameter (J) and the flux gradient in the reactor. Samples and standards were analyzed 45 to 90 days after irradiation.

    The irradiated samples were step-heated on-line in a Modifications Ltd. low-blank furnace. Temperature control was better than 5 degrees and a maximum temperature in excess of 1600o C was achievable to ensure complete sample fusion. The extracted argon was purified in a two-stage process using a liquid nitrogen cold finger and two SAES Zr-Al getters. Prior to measurement of the Ar, the gas was collected on an activated charcoal finger. The purified Ar gas was measured using a Nuclide 6-60-SGA 15 cm mass spectrometer. The sensitivity of the spectrometer is 6.5 x 10-15 mol/mV and system noise is generally around 0.02 mV. System blanks are generally better than 1 X 10-14 mol for 40Ar. Argon isotopic measurements for both samples and standards were corrected for the system blanks, for decay of 37Ar and 39Ar, and for reactor-induced isotopic interferences. Ages were calculated using the equations and corrections from McDougall and Harrison (1999) and the constants from Steiger and Jaeger (1977). All errors on analyses are reported at the 1-sigma level.

    For each mass spectrometer analysis, five Ar isotope abundances are measured. 36Ar is used to determine the amount of atmospheric or initial Ar in the sample, 37Ar provides an estimation of the Ca content in the mineral, 38Ar provides an estimation of the Cl content, 39Ar reflects the K content and 40Ar is a mixture of initial and radiogenic Ar. The age of the sample is proportional to the ratio of the amount of radiogenic 40Ar to the amount of 39Ar produced by neutron bombardment from 40K.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • Samson and Alexander, 1987
    • Lanphere and others, 1990
    • McDougall and Harrison, 1999
    • Steiger and Jaeger, 1977

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

    All field locations were visually determined by the geologists in the field and recorded on a 1:63,360 topographic map. Coordinates were digitized visually from the field maps. DGGS submitted eight rock samples to the UAF Geochronology Laboratory for 40Ar/39Ar dating; three were collected from Granite Mountain in the Candle B-5 quadrangle and four were collected from the Selawik Hills in the Selawik quadrangle. Major oxide and selected trace element analyses for some of the samples are included in Solie and others (1993a). Separates for 40Ar/39Ar dating were prepared to >99.5 percent purity (visual inspection) using standard heavy liquid and magnetic separation techniques followed by hand-picking under a binocular microscope. Thin section examination of the samples prior to crushing indicated that the chosen minerals were free from alteration and sufficiently coarse-grained for mechanical separation. For all minerals, grains in the size range of 250 - 500 microns were used. For each sample, ~50-80 mg of biotite or 250-350 mg of hornblende or ‘whole rock’ (phenocryst-free groundmass) was packaged in an aluminum foil tube and irradiated in position 5C at the McMaster University nuclear reactor, in Hamilton, Ontario. Approximately 20 samples were irradiated at a time. Six packages containing ~20 mg of the standard mineral mmhb-1 (Samson and Alexander, 1987) with an age of 513.9 Ma (Lanphere and others, 1990) were also irradiated with the samples to determine the irradiation parameter (J) and the flux gradient in the reactor. Samples and standards were analyzed 45 to 90 days after irradiation. The irradiated samples were step-heated on-line in a Modifications Ltd. low-blank furnace. Temperature control was better than 5 degrees and a maximum temperature in excess of 1600o C was achievable to ensure complete sample fusion. The extracted argon was purified in a two-stage process using a liquid nitrogen cold finger and two SAES Zr-Al getters. Prior to measurement of the Ar, the gas was collected on an activated charcoal finger. The purified Ar gas was measured using a Nuclide 6-60-SGA 15 cm mass spectrometer. The sensitivity of the spectrometer is 6.5 x 10-15 mol/mV and system noise is generally around 0.02 mV. System blanks are generally better than 1 X 10-14 mol for 40Ar. Argon isotopic measurements for both samples and standards were corrected for the system blanks, for decay of 37Ar and 39Ar, and for reactor-induced isotopic interferences. Ages were calculated using the equations and corrections from McDougall and Harrison (1999) and the constants from Steiger and Jaeger (1977). Age, Ca/K and Cl/K spectra plots are shown in figure 3, and analytical age data are shown in Tables 2 and 3. All errors on analyses are reported at the 1-sigma level. For each mass spectrometer analysis, five Ar isotope abundances are measured. 36Ar is used to determine the amount of atmospheric or initial Ar in the sample, 37Ar provides an estimation of the Ca content in the mineral, 38Ar provides an estimation of the Cl content, 39Ar reflects the K content and 40Ar is a mixture of initial and radiogenic Ar. The age of the sample is proportional to the ratio of the amount of radiogenic 40Ar to the amount of 39Ar produced by neutron bombardment from 40K. All samples were dated by the 40Ar/39Ar step-heating method. In this method, a sample is heated to progressively higher temperatures in a double-vacuum resistance-heated furnace, and the argon isotopes are measured and age determined for each step (fraction). The integrated age is the age given by the total gas measured in all fractions and is equivalent to a potassium-argon (K-Ar) age. The fractions are commonly plotted on an age spectrum plot for analysis. A spectrum provides a plateau age if three or more consecutive gas fractions represent at least 50% of the total gas release and are within two standard deviations of each other (Mean Square Weighted Deviation less than ~2.5). If the fractions do not meet the criteria for a plateau due to intrafraction scatter in ages, then a weighted mean age of ‘plateau-like’ fractions, with each fraction weighted by the volume of 39Ar released, is calculated.

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

    Sample locations were determined visually by geologist in the field, using a brunton compass and altimeter and topographic map. Locations were then digitized visually from the field maps using ArcGIS v9.2.

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    This dataset includes all of the samples submitted for 40Ar/39Ar age date analyses from the Selawik and Candle quadrangle which were collected by DGGS during the summer of 1991. Hand samples and thin sections are no longer available for the samples dated. The brief sample descriptions in text are compiled from field notes and some preliminary petrographic notes from 1991.

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    No topologic relationships are present in the data.


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints:
This report and/or dataset is available directly from the State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (see contact information below).
Use_Constraints:
Any hard copies or published datasets utilizing these datasets shall clearly indicate their source. If the user has modified the data in any way, the user is obligated to describe the types of modifications the user has made. User specifically agrees not to misrepresent these datasets, nor to imply that changes made by the user were approved by the State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys
    Natural Resource Technician
    3354 College Road
    Fairbanks, AK 99709-3707
    USA

    907-451-5020 (voice)
    907-451-5050 (FAX)
    dggspubs@alaska.gov

    Hours_of_Service: 8 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, except State holidays
    Contact_Instructions:
    Please view our Web site (<http://www.dggs.dnr.state.ak.us>) for the latest information on available data. Please contact us using the e-mail address provided above when possible.
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

    Raw-Data File

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    The State of Alaska makes no express or implied warranties (including warranties of merchantability and fitness) with respect to the character, function, or capabilities of the electronic services or products or their appropriateness for any user's purposes. In no event will the State of Alaska be liable for any incidental, indirect, special, consequential, or other damages suffered by the user or any other person or entity whether from the use of the electronic services or products, any failure thereof, or otherwise, and in no event will the State of Alaska's liability to the requester or anyone else exceed the fee paid for the electronic service or product.

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 31-Oct-2008
Metadata author:
State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys
Metadata Manager
3354 College Road
Fairbanks, AK 99709-3707
USA

907-451-5039 (voice)
907-451-5050 (FAX)
dggspubs@alaska.gov

Hours_of_Service: 8 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, except State holidays.
Contact_Instructions:
Please contact us through the e-mail address above whenever possible.
Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)


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