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Cornwell, J.C., 1983

The geochemistry of manganese, iron, and phosphorous in an Arctic lake

Bibliographic Reference

Cornwell, J.C., 1983, The geochemistry of manganese, iron, and phosphorous in an Arctic lake: University of Alaska Fairbanks, Ph.D. dissertation, 234 p., charts, illust.

Abstract

Sediment redox processes were investigated in an oligotrophic, arctic lake containing metal oxide crusts in oxidizing surficial sediments (up to 22% Mn and 26% Fe). Toolik Lake, Alaska, a 12,000 year old kettle lake, has the lowest Pb-210 derived sedimentation rates reported for any lake (27 g m-2 yr-1). Three independent methods for estimation of Mn, Fe and P retention within the lake (stream budgets, sediment traps and sediment burial rates) provide similar rates. Of the amounts entering the lake, 28% of P, 50% of Mn and 55% of Fe are retained. Common water column removal mechanisms for these elements and organic C are suggested by sediment trap data. A steady state diagenetic model with terms for diffusion, reduction and oxidation shows that Mn and Fe crusts migrate within surficial sediments. Metal oxide burial rates are equivalent to oxide dissolution rates (reduction), rates of upward diffusion of soluble divalent metals and metal precipitation rates (oxidation). High inputs of labile Mn and Fe from streams, plus low sedimentation and organic matter oxidation rates are important for crust formation. Approximately 12% of Mn and 2% of acid reducible Fe retained by the lake since its formation exist as diagenetic oxides; the rest is buried within reducing sediment. Sediment inorganic P migrates with Fe to form P enriched sediment zones with pore water PO(,4) concentrations beneath these zones regulated by vivianite (Fe3)(PO4)2 8H2O) formation. The migration of Mn and Fe within sediments results in the enrichment of Ba, Co, Ca, Ni, Ra-226 and carbonate in metal oxide enriched sediments. Barium is enriched in Mn crusts because of diagenetic migration.

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