Elliott, J.L., 2011

Publication Details

  • Title:

    Active tectonics in southern Alaska and the role of the Yakutat block constrained by GPS measurements
  • Authors:

    Elliott, J.L.
  • Publication Date:

    2011
  • Publisher:

    University of Alaska Fairbanks 
  • Ordering Info:

    Not available
  • Quadrangle(s):

    Atlin; Bering Glacier; Bradfield Canal; Cordova; Craig; Dixon Entrance; Icy Bay; Juneau; Ketchikan; McCarthy; Middleton Island; Mount Fairweather; Mount Saint Elias; Petersburg; Port Alexander; Prince Rupert; Sitka; Skagway; Sumdum; Taku River; Valdez; Yakutat

Bibliographic Reference

Elliott, J.L., 2011, Active tectonics in southern Alaska and the role of the Yakutat block constrained by GPS measurements: University of Alaska Fairbanks, Ph.D. dissertation, xiv, 174 p., maps.

Abstract

GPS data from southern Alaska and the northern Canadian Cordillera have helped redefine the region's tectonic landscape. Instead of a comparatively simple interaction between the Pacific and North American plates, with relative motion accommodated on a single boundary fault, the margin is made up of a number of small blocks and deformation zones with relative motion distributed across a variety of structures. Much of this complexity can be attributed to the Yakutat block, an allochthonous terrane that has been colliding with southern Alaska since the Miocene. This thesis presents GPS data from across the region and uses it to constrain a tectonic model for the Yakutat block collision and its effects on southern Alaska and eastern Canada. The Yakutat block itself moves NNW at a rate of 50 mm/yr. Along its eastern edge, the Yakutat block is fragmenting into small crustal slivers. Part of the strain from the collision is transferred east of the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte fault system, causing the region inboard of the Fairweather fault to undergo a distinct clockwise rotation into the northern Canadian Cordillera. About 5% of the relative motion is transferred even further east, causing small northeasterly motions well into the northern Cordillera. Farther north, the GPS data and model results indicate that the current deformation front between the Yakutat block and southern Alaska runs along the western side of the Malaspina Glacier. The majority of the ~37 mm/yr of relative convergence is accommodated along a narrow band of thrust faults concentrated in the southeastern part of the St. Elias orogen. Near the Bering Glacier, the tectonic regime abruptly changes as crustal thrust faults give way to subduction of the Yakutat block beneath the western St. Elias orogen and Prince William Sound. This change aligns with the Gulf of Alaska shear zone, implying that the Pacific plate is fragmenting in response to the Yakutat collision. The Bering Glacier region is undergoing internal deformation and may represent the final stage of accretion of the Yakutat block sedimentary layers. Further west, modeled block motions suggest the crust is laterally escaping along the Aleutian forearc.

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